This is who has what

This morning I set you a little teaser: put these organisations and their incomes together.

Here’s the answer:

RSPB £137m

WWF-UK £71m

WWT £24m

GWCT  £7.2m

BTO  £5.8m

Butterfly Conservation  £3.7m

Marine Conservation Society  £2.9m

Plantlife  £2.8m

Buglife  £1.1m

 

What do you make of that?

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11 Replies to “This is who has what”

  1. Wwt high on the list presumably because of income from relatively high reserve entrance fees.

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  2. Actually thought the RSPB would get a hell of a lot more money. They actually do a really good job with what they get.

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    1. Legacies give a lot of money from a very small outlay in asking for them, what is known as return on investment. And the RSPB have lots of legacy income, which will keep their costs down.

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  3. Great work by the rspb on really not that large amount. But my money is with the British Dragonfly Society.

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  4. I reckon the rest could learn from what Butterfly Conservation and the BTO achieve on their incomes compared to the others, both those above and below in the list.

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  5. Although receiving criticism from many quarters over the driven Grouse debate, the GWCT conducts a wide variety of research that has many applications in the wider countryside.
    With its connection to driven shooting, and the money involved ,the trust probably receives an income that could seem out of proportion to its quoted membership.
    The BTO with its perceived scientific bias , has always struggled to compete for funds with what are thought of, often incorrectly, as pure conservation charities.
    It needs a larger proportion of the people who are regularly seen at major twitches up and down the country, and indeed birders in general,to realise the vital importance of their work to the future of Birding in the UK.

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